Ubuntu blogs

Ubuntu or Kubuntu - Why not BOTH ?

I can declare myself as a begginer in Linux world (not a total , but still a begginer). Before a Ubuntu, I install several distros on my PC (Mandrake, Knoppix, SuSE,,,) but neither of them last more than few days. With Ubuntu - that changes. At first I install Ubuntu (with GNOME) and I was satisfied for some time. Then I wish for a KDE, so I install Kubuntu - and that last for a few days - so I install both (at boot (GRUB) I decided witch one to use). After some time that becomes anoying, until I found a solution on net: I install Ubuntu, add a Kubuntu CD into Synaptic respository, and install KDE (kubuntu-desktop).Voila - decision between GNOME and KDE is in my login screen.I apologie on my bad english - it's not my native language.

Google brings its own Ubuntu derivative

Google is preparing its own distribution of Linux for the desktop, in a possible bid to take on Microsoft in its core business - desktop software.

A version of the increasingly popular Ubuntu desktop Linux distribution, based on Debian and the Gnome desktop, it is known internally as 'Goobuntu'.

Google has confirmed it is working on a desktop linux project called Goobuntu, but declined to supply further details, including what the project is for.

You can find the full article on http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/01/31/google_goes_desktop_linux/

Ubuntu server or Debian server

I have got a server with RH9, apache2, samba, php and mysql 3.23... Actually it was installed as a work station 2 years ago. I would like to upgrade it. At first I thought that I could install a Debian Sarge as server. But after reading what's on the Ubuntu site, I saw that Ubuntu proposes a server version too. Debian is well know for its stability. I am now wondering what I can install: Ubuntu server or Debian server. Has anybody already tried the Ubuntu server?

Problem with multiple locations on Laptop

Hi, I am new to the group and linux, have been playing around for a while but now am spending more time trying to get to grips with the system. I currently am trying to set up a server at home and run dhcp to enable me to plug my laptop in with no hassels. (Using ubuntu 5.10 on both machines) All is going well except that I am unable to set up different network locations on the laptop?  I use a fixed IP at work so need to re-enter all network settings every time I plug in at the office. Does anyone have any suggestions for me.

Versora - Migrate settings and files from Windows to Linux

Here is a nice way to integrate a former windows user into the Linux environment. It's called Versora. They just partnered with Linspire (probably to gain more exposure)  but they also sell to all other linux users.

http://www.versora.com/products/progression_desktop.php

Basically, it allows you to migrate settings, files, folders, email, wallpaper, network shares, and much more over to your linux desktop easily. The best part is that they don't charge an arm and a leg for it. It's $30, for either the download, or the boxed version, and is incredibly simple to use. Check out the website for a virtual demo.

Nubuntu - Network Ubuntu aimed at security.

I thought I would download this, and install it in VMWare on my home computer, just to see what it offers. It looks like it has a wide range of tools available for it, and since it uses fluxbox as the window manager, I'd like to check that out as well.

This will most likely end up being my "Security Aversion" desktop. Before, I was using a heavily modified version of windows 98se, but that was buggy at best, once everything was loaded on. This, I think, should do much better. Right now I have a small amount of security on my linux box, though I haven't disabled anything, and I'm running Firestarter.

Since this comes with quite a few wireless cracking tools, I may pick up a wireless card, and see what I can break into with it. ^_^ My neighbors have all told me that thier networks are so secure now that they put WEP encrytion on them, and I am just itching for a chance to prove them wrong. Besides, I've gotten permission from one of them already.

My first Blog

This will be my first ever blog, on any site. I figured I would host it here for the specific reason that I am using ubuntu for my main distrobution, and I need an area to organize my thoughts.

About Linux

Okay for my computer tech class final exam, part of it we were supposed to write about Windows Vista. I suggested to the teacher we write about something else because there isn't too much we can do about it so he said well since some of you will take the course next year and it touches on Linux, you can write an overview about that. I said, freakin' sweet. So I turned around and wrote a few paragraphs of what I knew off the top of my head while the rest of my class struggled because they all new zilch. So here, I present to you my writeup;

Linux is an operating system similar to Windows. It was created by a Finnish software engineer by the name of Linus Torvalds during his college years in the early 1990s. It is an open source operating system that is free to be modified and improved by any programmer who wishes to make changes to the code. Linux was derived from a kernel and opearting system called Minix. It was developed to be a Unix based operating system, that ran on the PC. Linus now coordinates the kernel in Linux. He organizes what goes into each release, when it will be released and more. Similar to a kernel in Windows, the Linux kernel contains all the instructions for the computer to function. It also contains drivers for any hardware to be used by the computer. Linux is well known among computer geeks as a stable operating system and has been widely accepted as such.

First one!

Alright I just joined this site and it seems pretty cool. I shall post as often as I can think of something Linux related to write about. Not that anyone will care or even read it but I will anyway, just because I can. Go me!

Ubuntu or Kubuntu?

Hi! I heard so many positive things about Ubuntu, so that I want to try it out now. I'm just not sure whether to start with Gnome-based Ubuntu or KDE-based Kubuntu. Are there any other differences besides the desktop? I don't care how it looks, it should just work and most of all be simply to use. I have no linux experience so far, just Windows. What do you recommend for a newbie like me? Which distro is more matured?

Ubuntu-like names

Ubuntu has a history of semi-weird codenames for their releases (Warty Warthog, Hoary Hedgehog, Breezy Badger, Dapper Drake). The people in #ubuntu-offtopic on IRC regularly make parodies on these names. Their brainfarts are collected at http://wiki.kaarsemaker.net/UbuntuNames.

There are some really funny ones, like Horrible Hippopotamus, Nutritious Nightingale, or Spastic Swan.

Feel free to add more on that list if you know some more Ubuntu-like names.

Addendum to my Zim experience.

Not being completely happy about the Gtk2:TrayIcon module problem.  I came back to the problem again tonight.  I spent a lot of time constantly downloading perl modules that failed to install due to some missing dependency, so that was largely a waste of time.  I then decided that there must be some way of installing some of this stuff via synaptic.  I had looked earlier with regards to some of the other modules I was having trouble with, but this time around I happened to notice a libgtk2-trayicon-perl package in the repository.  I slap my forehead, and utter a common exclamation attributed to Homer Simpson, and then crossing my fingers I install the package.  I then went and changed the config file for Zim in my $HOME directory to enable the tray icon. Starting up Zim I was pleased to see I now had tray icon functionality. :)  Yay!  Zim has been one of those 'dependency hell' installations that I have heard so much about.  It sure looks good when its working though.

I've been trying to be a bit more bold lately.

When I first started mucking around on Ubuntu, I managed to bust my installation a few times.  I became quite proficient at re-installing and having two hard drives installed, I was always running two copies of Ubuntu so that I could always have one that was functioning.  I soon learnt the usefulness of having my /home on a seperate partition, so that my user settings survived the process and also I became proficient at transferring my downloaded .deb files in my /var/cache/apt/archives over to my new install, so that I could avoid downloading them all again (I'm on a dialup connection so this is painful). I started hanging out in the #ubuntu channel on IRC, and was soon taken under the wing by one of the regulars there who was more proficient at linux than I was, and instructed in the methods of 'how to do thing without breaking your box'.  Since then I have been fairly careful with what I have installed on my system.  I would always favour installation of software from the ubuntu repositories over trying to install the latest versions from source, and never leaving non-ubuntu sources sitting in my sources.list after I had acquired whatever particular package I was after.

Greetings All

I've just signed up to see how things work over here at Ubuntux.  I am a regular contributor on the Ubuntu Forums and hang out a bit in the Ubuntu IRC support channel.  I'm hoping to find some interesting blog entries relating to Ubuntu. :)

3rd preview of Ubuntu 6.04 (Dapper Drake) released

The Ubuntu developer have released a new preview of the upcoming version "Dapper Drake". It fixes bugs and brings some new components.

It still uses kernel 2.6.15 and brings the new modular X.Org 7.0. Besides the new functions this new version brings, the modularity brings some positive aspects to updating X.Org. In future there is no need to download the whole X-Window-System any more, but only parts of it which leads to smaller file sizes of updates.

The third preview called "Flight CD 3" contains the current GNOME developing version 2.13.4, which has been customized optically to the Ubuntu look. You'll find revised menus, a brand-new logoff screen and improved update notifications. A small icon in the systray informs you about a required reboot after having installed major updates.

The installer has become even quicker and supports network cards, which require a firmware image. If installing on a USB stick GRUB and the kickstart support work correctly again.

By using Squashfs and Unionfs the Live-CD is smaller and quicker and from now on only the Launchpad.net project will be used for reporting bugs in the distribution.

The Flight CD 3 for Ubuntu 6.10 can be downloaded from the official website, a Flight CD 3 for Kubuntu 6.10 and a Flight CD 3 for Edubuntu 6.10 is also available. Ubuntu 6.04 is going to be released in April 2006 as final version.